Sweet Treats

Recipe—Peach Mousse

Peach Mousse
A couple of weeks ago, I did my first ever live cooking demo on Instagram. I shared my recipes for a delicious Italian Chicken Dinner and easy Cannoli Dip. This cooking demo was part of a summer event series hosted by Sac State UNIQUE Programs. They typically host local bands for their Nooners (noon-time events), so I was really excited to share a couple of recipes! UNIQUE Programs also had Carly Preston of Adventures In Yum do a live cooking demo at the beginning of July. Carly and I thought it would be fun to partner up as guest bloggers for a little recipe swap since we both have so many amazing recipes to share with our followers. She has been posting recipes since summer of 2019 and she has a lot of great posts on her site, especially desserts! Seriously, she is the dessert queen! Make sure you go check out Adventures In Yum!

Today she is sharing with you all her recipe for Peach Mousse. Look at how beautiful and fluffy it looks! And you know I am all about using seasonal produce and since it is stone fruit season this seems perfect! Just add a refreshing drink like my Summertime White Sangria and enjoy the refreshing flavors of summer.

I present to you, a recipe for Peach Mousse from Adventures In Yum!

Peach Mousse

Happy Stone Fruit Season! With peaches, nectarines, and plums being plentiful during this time of year, I love to create at least a couple of fun desserts every year with these flavorful summer fruits.

Peaches are one of my go-to summer fruits when making desserts. When I think about them, I always think of peach cobbler. Last year I made a couple of yummy treats inspired by this classic dessert, so if you love peach cobbler, I highly recommend checking out my Peach Cobbler Cupcakes and my Boozy Peach Cobbler Milkshakes. Both will give you the flavors of peach cobbler, but in fun and different ways.

When thinking about what peach dessert to make this year, I wanted to make something that was very light. An airy, no-bake dessert is the perfect treat for this time of year! The result? My peach mousse! I first tested this recipe last year when I decided to make a peach cobbler inspired dessert in the shape of a peach. The mousse was the outermost layer of the peach, and it offered a lighter texture compared to the “peach pit” made of peach curd and peach compote. All three layers of peach plus the streusel topping “gravel” gave all the flavor of a peach cobbler, but in a light and refreshing take on the traditional dessert.

Finishing this yummy mousse with a dollop of whipped cream and/or some crunchy streusel topping is a great way to add a delicious depth of flavor and a great textural component. The flavors will remind you of peach cobbler, but the components will result in a lovely, light treat.

Peach Mousse

INGREDIENTS
1/2 c cool water
2 packets of unflavored gelatin
1 c heavy whipping cream
1/4 c granulated sugar
2 c peach purée
4 egg whites
1/4 cup + 2 tablespoons granulated sugar

OPTIONAL GARNISHES
Whipped cream
Streusel Topping (Found in my Peach Cobbler Cupcakes post)

STEPS

  • To a small microwave-safe bowl, add a 1/2 cup water and then sprinkle the 2 packets of powdered gelatin over the top.
  • Briefly mix together and set aside for 5 minutes to allow the gelatin to bloom, and prep the rest of your ingredients and equipment.
  • Next, place the gelatin in the microwave and heat for 15–30 seconds, until all the gelatin has melted. Set aside to work on the rest of the components.
  • To a stand mixer bowl, add the 1/4 cup + 2 tablespoons of granulated sugar and 4 egg whites.
  • Using a wire whisk, whisk these ingredients by hand and then place the bowl over a medium saucepan containing simmering water.
  • Constantly whip this mixture until all of the sugar dissolves and reaches a temperature of 140°F on a thermometer. (This will pasteurize the egg whites so that they are safe for consumption.)
  • Remove the bowl from the stove, place it in the stand mixer, and whip on medium until it achieves medium peaks.
  • While the meringue whips, add the remaining 1/4 cup of granulated sugar and 1 cup cold heavy whipping cream to a medium mixing bowl whisk either by hand or with a hand mixer until you reach medium peaks.
  • In a large mixing bowl, stir together the peach puree and melted gelatin.
  • Next, fold the whipped cream into the mixture.
  • And finally, gently fold the meringue into the mixture. Fill your favorite serving glasses with the peach mousse and let it set for at least an hour.
  • The peach mousse is set and ready to serve!
  • Optional toppings include a nice dollop of whipped cream and/or a sprinkle of crunchy streusel topping.

Thank you so much for checking out this recipe! I hope you enjoy it as much as my taste-testers and I did!

Kitchen Tips

Winter Produce

It’s the first day of winter and to celebrate I have a very special post, focusing on the seasonal fruits and vegetables throughout the year.

I am a firm believer that you should eat “seasonally,” or include foods in your meals that are grown at the same time of the year you eat them. For example, that means beets in the winter, and corn in the summer. Eating seasonally is important, and carries benefits to your health and your wallet.

At first glance, eating seasonally may seem simple—you eat foods that are in season, or being grown and harvested at the time of the year when you buy them. But there’s more to it than just being a trendy food movement. There are real benefits to eating foods that are available at their peak right now.

Perhaps the biggest tangible benefit of eating seasonally is that you’ll save money at the grocery store and farmer’s markets. When you buy what’s in season, you buy food that’s at the peak of its supply, and costs less to farmers and distribution companies to harvest and get to your grocery store. It may seem like common sense, but it’s one of those things many of us ignore when we’re shopping.

However, the best consequence of eating seasonally is that you get the best tasting, healthiest produce available. The same reasons that keep the cost of seasonal food down also drive its quality up: The food is grown closer to you so it doesn’t spoil on its trip, it’s harvested at the peak of its season, and sold during its season, before it spoils. Ideally, this means you’re getting fruits and vegetables that haven’t had time to lose their flavor or their health benefits by sitting in a shipping container for a trip across the ocean.

Please feel free to print this little “cheat sheet” and post in on the fridge as a reminder of what to look for at the grocery store this winter.

Sources: Life Hacker and United States Department of Agriculture

Kitchen Tips

Fall Produce

It’s the first day of fall and to celebrate I have a very special post, focusing on the seasonal fruits and vegetables throughout the year.

I am a firm believer that you should eat “seasonally,” or include foods in your meals that are grown at the same time of the year you eat them. For example, that means cauliflower in the fall, and corn in the summer. Eating seasonally is important, and carries benefits to your health and your wallet.

At first glance, eating seasonally may seem simple—you eat foods that are in season, or being grown and harvested at the time of the year when you buy them. But there’s more to it than just being a trendy food movement. There are real benefits to eating foods that are available at their peak right now.

Perhaps the biggest tangible benefit of eating seasonally is that you’ll save money at the grocery store and farmer’s markets. When you buy what’s in season, you buy food that’s at the peak of its supply, and costs less to farmers and distribution companies to harvest and get to your grocery store. It may seem like common sense, but it’s one of those things many of us ignore when we’re shopping.

However, the best consequence of eating seasonally is that you get the best tasting, healthiest produce available. The same reasons that keep the cost of seasonal food down also drive its quality up: The food is grown closer to you so it doesn’t spoil on its trip, it’s harvested at the peak of its season, and sold during its season, before it spoils. Ideally, this means you’re getting fruits and vegetables that haven’t had time to lose their flavor or their health benefits by sitting in a shipping container for a trip across the ocean.

Please feel free to print this little “cheat sheet” and post in on the fridge as a reminder of what to look for at the grocery store this fall.

Sources: Life Hacker and United States Department of Agriculture

Kitchen Tips

Summer Produce

It’s the first day of summer and to celebrate I have a very special post, focusing on the seasonal fruits and vegetables throughout the year.

I am a firm believer that you should eat “seasonally,” or include foods in your meals that are grown at the same time of the year you eat them. For example, that means corn in the summer, and leeks in the winter. Eating seasonally is important, and carries benefits to your health and your wallet.

At first glance, eating seasonally may seem simple—you eat foods that are in season, or being grown and harvested at the time of the year when you buy them. But there’s more to it than just being a trendy food movement. There are real benefits to eating foods that are available at their peak right now.

Perhaps the biggest tangible benefit of eating seasonally is that you’ll save money at the grocery store and farmer’s markets. When you buy what’s in season, you buy food that’s at the peak of its supply, and costs less to farmers and distribution companies to harvest and get to your grocery store. It may seem like common sense, but it’s one of those things many of us ignore when we’re shopping.

However, the best consequence of eating seasonally is that you get the best tasting, healthiest produce available. The same reasons that keep the cost of seasonal food down also drive its quality up: The food is grown closer to you so it doesn’t spoil on its trip, it’s harvested at the peak of its season, and sold during its season, before it spoils. Ideally, this means you’re getting fruits and vegetables that haven’t had time to lose their flavor or their health benefits by sitting in a shipping container for a trip across the ocean.

Please feel free to print this little “cheat sheet” and post in on the fridge as a reminder of what to look for at the grocery store this summer.

Sources: Life Hacker and United States Department of Agriculture

Kitchen Tips

Spring Produce

It’s the first day of spring and to celebrate I have a very special post, a new feature per say, focusing on the seasonal fruits and vegetables throughout the year.

I am a firm believer that you should eat “seasonally,” or include foods in your meals that are grown at the same time of the year you eat them. For example, that means strawberries in the spring and summer, and pears in the fall. Eating seasonally is important, and carries benefits to your health and your wallet.

At first glance, eating seasonally may seem simple—you eat foods that are in season, or being grown and harvested at the time of the year when you buy them. But there’s more to it than just being a trendy food movement. There are real benefits to eating foods that are available at their peak right now.

Perhaps the biggest tangible benefit of eating seasonally is that you’ll save money at the grocery store and farmer’s markets. When you buy what’s in season, you buy food that’s at the peak of its supply, and costs less to farmers and distribution companies to harvest and get to your grocery store. It may seem like common sense, but it’s one of those things many of us ignore when we’re shopping.

However, the best consequence of eating seasonally is that you get the best tasting, healthiest produce available. The same reasons that keep the cost of seasonal food down also drive its quality up: The food is grown closer to you so it doesn’t spoil on its trip, it’s harvested at the peak of its season, and sold during its season, before it spoils. Ideally, this means you’re getting fruits and vegetables that haven’t had time to lose their flavor or their health benefits by sitting in a shipping container for a trip across the ocean.

Please feel free to print this little “cheat sheet” and post in on the fridge as a reminder of what to look for at the grocery store this spring.

Sources: Life Hacker and United States Department of Agriculture